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POLICE SHOOTING-MICHIGAN

Video: Michigan cop on Black man’s back, fatally shot him

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) — Video shows a Michigan police officer struggling with a Black man over a Taser before fatally shooting him in the head while the man was face down on the ground. Grand Rapids police released video from different sources Wednesday, nine days after Patrick Lyoya was killed during a traffic stop. Key footage came from a passenger in the car. Video shows Lyoya trying to run and a struggle over the officer’s Taser. The new police chief in Grand Rapids says he released the videos in the spirit of transparency. State police are investigating the shooting. Chief Eric Winstrom says the shooting is a “tragedy.” City Manager Mark Washington says he’s bracing for “shock” and “anger” by the public.

BC-US-MUSIC-LIBRARY-OF-CONGRESS

Songs by Wu-Tang, Alicia Keys added to Recording Registry

NASHVILLE, Tennessee (AP) — Debut albums by Wu-Tang Clan and Alicia Keys, along with the Latin pop megahit “Livin’ La Vida Loca” and Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody,“ are being inducted into the National Recording Registry. The Library of Congress announced 25 songs, albums, historical recordings and a podcast that are being preserved this year as important contributions to culture and history. Other songs being included are Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin,’” “Walking the Floor Over You” by Ernest Tubb, “Moon River” by Andy Williams and “Reach Out, I’ll Be There,” by The Four Tops.

BC-US-SCI-CARBON-CAPTURE-ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE

Battle over carbon capture as tool to fight climate change

Last year, Congress pledged $3.5 billion to carbon capture and sequestration projects around the United States, which has been called the largest federal investment ever by advocates for the technology. Advocates say that the technology is much needed if the world hopes to transition away from fossil fuels, and the United Nations’ top scientists say it could be part of the solution. But environmental justice advocates and residents of legacy pollution communities are wary of the technology, with many calling it a “false solution.”

MICHIGAN GOVERNOR

Brown is 3rd Republican governor candidate to file petitions

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — State Police Capt. Mike Brown has submitted nominating petitions to run for governor, saying he brings “trusted leadership” to what is expected to be a large Republican primary field vying to challenge Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer. Brown is the third Republican candidate to turn in signatures, joining chiropractor and grassroots activist Garrett Soldano and financial adviser Michael Markey. Contenders must file 15,000 to 30,000 signatures by next week to advance to the August primary. Several top candidates have not yet submitted petitions. Brown, who will struggle to get his message out without more money, says voters don’t want another millionaire self-funder to be the Republican nominee.

GRAND RAPIDS POLICE SHOOTING-PROTEST

Protesters go to Grand Rapids Commission demanding justice

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) — More than 100 people have marched to a Grand Rapids City Commission meeting demanding justice for a 26-year-old Black man shot and killed by a city police officer. The Royal Black Panther Party Grand Rapids organized the march to the commission’s meeting Tuesday evening at City Hall. The Grand Rapids Press reports protesters chanted “Black lives matter,” “No justice, no peace” and “Say his name: Patrick” as they streamed into City Hall. The chants could be heard nine floors up in commission chambers, where the panel met for the first time since a Grand Rapids police officer killed Patrick Lyoya on April 4.

MICHIGAN GOVERNOR-KIDNAPPING PLOT-EXPLAINER

EXPLAINER: 2 men in Gov. Whitmer plot could be tried again

DETROIT (AP) — A jury last week couldn’t reach a unanimous verdict for two men charged with a conspiracy to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer. It means the federal government can take Adam Fox and Barry Croft Jr. to trial again. A hung jury is unable to unanimously agree on whether someone is guilty or innocent. It could be just one person on the 12-member panel who disagrees with the others. Former federal prosecutor Mark Chutkow would be surprised if prosecutors fold, citing allegations of a violent plot against a governor. U.S. Attorney Andrew Birge says his team will get back to work on the case. Two other men were acquitted of all charges.

MICHIGAN STATE-COACH

Danton Cole is out as Michigan State hockey coach

EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Danton Cole won’t return as Michigan State hockey coach. Athletic director Alan Haller says the team needs a “fresh start” after a 12-23-1 season. The Spartans lost 15 of their last 16 games. Cole’s record over five seasons was 58-101-12. Cole was coach for the USA Hockey National Team Development Program before returning to MSU in 2017. Cole played on MSU’s 1986 national championship team. He and Don McSween share the school record for most games played, 180. Haller says Cole “put his heart” into his job as coach.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-MICHIGAN CHIEF JUSTICE

Michigan’s chief justice tests positive for COVID-19

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — The leader of the Michigan Supreme Court says she tested positive for COVID-19 after experiencing cold-like symptoms. Chief Justice Bridget Mary McCormack said in a statement that she was tested Saturday and had notified the court’s other justices and other close contacts. McCormack says she is fully vaccinated and has had two booster shots. Court spokesman John Nevin said he knew of no current illnesses among the six other justices and that McCormack planned to follow COVID-19 quarantine guidelines. McCormack has been a justice on Michigan’s highest court since 2013 and became the chief justice in 2019.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-MILITARY MEDICAL TEAMS

With COVID mission over, Pentagon plans for next pandemic

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. military medical teams deployed during the coronavirus pandemic brought back lessons as the Defense Department looks to see what worked and what didn’t. The teams were used to relieve exhausted civilian medical workers and provide care to what seemed to be an endless crush of COVID-19 patients. Overall, about 24,000 U.S. troops were deployed for the pandemic, including nearly 6,000 medical personnel to hospitals and 5,000 to help administer vaccines. That mission is over, at least for now. And military leaders are taking stock so they will be better prepared for the next crisis affecting a large population.

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